Review: The Love Letters of Abelard and Lily

The Love Letters of Abelard and Lily
Laura Creedle
Published December 26, 2017 by HMH Books for Young Readers

“I am broken because I have a disability. I am broken because I am incapable of sitting still for hours at a time and performing the mind-numbing repetitive tasks that I am required to do. Abelard is broken because he can’t smile and say hello, and he doesn’t like crowds, which is basically what high school is–one giant, swirling, chaotic crowd.”

Lily is a high school student with ADHD. School is a daily chaotic torture for her. She’s skipping class, and she’s failing many of her classes, because her ADHD makes the bureaucratic nonsense of high school extremely difficult for her, even though she’s very smart. A mishap with a broken door lands her in detention with Abelard, a fellow student who’s on the autism spectrum. After Lily randomly kisses Abelard (she has definite issues with impulse control), the two form a connection and begin texting each, using quotes from the Letters of Abelard Heloise (a pair of star-crossed medieval lovers).

AbelardI really liked this book. It’s good to see ADHD and autism representation in a YA book. From my limited knowledge of ADHD, the portrayal seemed realistic. I really felt like I was inside the mind of a teenage with ADHD, and it showed how difficult life can be for someone with this condition. Some of the dialogue in the book is rendered as partial nonsense to show how Lily experiences it: “You’ll note, Miss Michaels-Ryan, that I have filled out a Skrellnetch form for you. Your mother will have to sign the kerblig and return it to the main office before you can be burn to clabs.” The portrayal of Abelard’s ASD felt realistic too, although we see less of his struggle since this is really Lily’s story.

Lily felt like a very realistic teenager. She’s not one of those extemely precocious, totally unrealistic YA teens. She’s a smart, but rather immature teenage with some serious impulse control issues. The mom in me wanted to shake Lily a few times, and say please tell someone that the drugs make you feel dead inside and that you have suicidal ideation. But her not telling anyone feels realistic and true to the character.

The romance is very sweet, and although it’s important to the plot, it’s not the sole focus. The book is just as much about Lily feeling broken and unfixable. I found Lily’s relationship with her mother a bit more compelling. Her mother is doing the best she can; she’s a single mom with limited resources and she’s in over her head. But she is really trying, and she leaps at the opportunity for a new treatment that might help Lily. Lily views all of her mother’s attempts to help her as merely trying to “fix” her, so there’s a lot of tension.

If you care about such things, the romance in this book is extremely chaste, on account of Abelard having issues with being touched. Although there is some kissing, most of the romance is over texts quoting the actual letters of Heloise and Abelard. (This is pretty swoony stuff for us medieval history buffs.)

I received an ARC from Amazon Vine.

 

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