Review: A Million Junes

A Million Junes
By Emily Henry
Published May 16, 2017 by Razorbill

A Million Junes was sort of under the radar for me. I hadn’t seen reviews from anyone I follow, and although I’d seen the cover and thought, “Oooh, pretty,” I hadn’t added it to my TBR. I finally read the description and realized it’s got all sorts of things I love: star-crossed lovers, ghosts, magical realism, and family secrets, so I picked it up.

A Million JunesThis one is really good, and I want to start pushing it on people. “Read this. No, really, read this!” That said, this book won’t be everyone’s cup of tea. If you’re not into magical realism, this may not be the book for you.

June O’Donnell s starting her senior year of high school when Saul Angert returns to town. The O’Donnells and the Angerts have been mortal enemies for several generations, supposedly because of a feud over the land that was once the O’Donnell’s cherry tree farm. June’s late father Jack O’Donnell III (June is actually Jack IV, but most people call her Junior or June) raised her on stories of the O’Donnell men’s glory and the perfidy of the Angerts. The family’s cardinal rule is stay away from the Angerts. So, of course, there’s an immediate attraction between June and the newly returned Saul.

Having grown up in the O’Donnell’s magical farmhouse, complete with two ghosts (a pink benign one and a dark, possibly malevolent one), and being raised on the O’Donnell tall tales, June has bought fully bought into the family mythology. Saul is much more skeptical, doesn’t believe in the curse that supposedly brings harm to both families, and sees no reason to stay away from June.

The romance is lovely and fraught with the complications of family history. I really appreciated that although the romance was important to the plot, the other relationships were also very important. June has a great relationship with her best friend Hannah and a good but sometimes tense relationship with her mother. And then there’s her relationship with her late father, Jack III. Even though he’s been dead for 10 years, he’s still a huge part of her life, and the idea of going against everything he told her and getting involved with an Angert is hard for her to get past, even as she begins to learn that the family legends her father passed along to her may not be the whole truth.

The magical elements are really well done. There are ghosts, coywolves who steal shoes, and white balls of fluff that float around the house and contain memories. I know it sounds a bit twee, but it all works in the context of the book, and the writing is just lovely. 4.5 stars.

One thought on “Review: A Million Junes

  1. Pingback: Best of 2017 and My Reading Year in Review | Reading for Two

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